Quintuplets Are Born!

 - by Take5

During my singleton pregnancy, my husband Bill and I took various classes: childbirth, infant care, etc.  I felt prepared and ready to have a baby!  However, I somehow came away thinking that all women experienced Braxton Hicks contractions at least once.  (These are contractions that are not real labor.)  So when I woke up in the wee hours of the morning one Thursday having contractions, I thought these were my Braxton Hicks.  I didn’t even bother to wake my husband figuring that he had to go to work that day while I could take a nap later.  So I sat on the couch and watched TV and somewhat tracked the contractions.  Around 7 that morning, I noticed that they did seem like they were getting close together and decided to wake Bill up.  Now I am normally a very organized, responsible person who is on top of things.  However, at this point, my contractions were between 4 and 5 minutes apart, and I was still convinced that I was not in real labor; however, my husband was equally convinced that I was!  We called the doctor’s office.  Since I seemed calm and not in extreme pain, they said to come in when their office opened.  That was fine with me because I wanted to have breakfast and clean the kitchen.  Although Bill was nervous about taking extra time, he agreed and those things were accomplished.  He did draw the line and said no when I wanted to vacuum the whole house though!  So we left for the doctor’s office (house un-vacuumed!).  I was still calm, walking fine and in relatively little pain.  The nurse hooked me up to the monitor and said I would probably be awhile.  When the doctor came to examine me, he determined that I was already 8 cm dilated and completely effaced!  (Ten cm dilated is when they have you start pushing.) 

 We walked over to the hospital and got checked in.  I was still doing well, but I was VERY scared that I would be too far along to get an epidural.  They said we still had time, and the anesthesiologist came to the room and did the epidural.  My parents came to the hospital to be with us.  A little after 2 that afternoon, the doctor said it was time.  I pushed for 12 minutes and out came our beautiful 8 pound blessing!  Mark William was born on Thursday, April 26, 2007, perfect and healthy and we couldn’t have been happier! 

Mom and Dad with Baby Mark

 Fast forward 18 months.  At 33 weeks pregnant with quintuplets, my body had given all it could give to carrying five precious babies.  My OB, Dr. Kirshon, said we needed to deliver at this point, and Baby A’s water broke.  Even though average delivery for quintuplets is 27 and a half weeks and we had been told that at 33 weeks odds were very good that the babies would all be healthy, I was still really nervous!  It just didn’t feel like it should be time yet!  They were still so small, but we trusted the doctors to take care of me and them.  I had felt pretty bad the night before, but I didn’t want to tell Bill and have him come to the hospital because I was afraid that would make everyone around me push for delivery.  When my contractions increased in intensity and quantity and then my water broke, the doctors were moving pretty fast.  It was an hour drive from our house to the hospital without traffic, and I was concerned Bill wouldn’t make it in time.  My parents went to our house to watch Mark, and Bill rushed to the hospital and made it before I went into the OR.  A lot of the delivery day was a blur for me. 

 By this point in the pregnancy, the only clothing I fit in was the extra large hospital gown, so I was already dressed and ready to go.  They moved me to the delivery area and prepped everything. Bill put on scrubs and met me in the OR.  He stood by my head and talked with me and took pictures.  The nurse anesthetist was awesome!  He was also by my head and talked to us and explained things which was very calming.  He also took our birth video! 

Phillips Quintuplets are Born

The OB broke each water one at a time and handed each baby off to be taken to the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to be examined.  There were at least 20 people involved in this process.  All five babies were born in about a minute and a half!  All were examined and found to be extremely healthy which meant that each baby could be brought back into the OR so that I could see them.  I even got to hold John! 

Mom and Dad with Baby John

The NICU has different levels.  Level 3 is what most people think of when they hear the term, and it is a high tech area where the doctors and nurses can deal very quickly with just about any problem that arises.  Level 2 is often nicknamed “feed and grow.”  In level 2, babies are monitored, they might need oxygen, and they probably need feeding help, but they don’t require as much attention as is needed in the higher level. 

Babies get a check-up in the NICU

 All five of our babies were immediately downgraded to level 2 after being examined!  What an amazing blessing for us!  Our quintuplets were born on Saturday, October 25, 2008, at 11:03 and 11:04 am.  John Daniel was 3 lbs 3 oz, Rebecca Jenne was 4 lbs 1 oz, Alison Marie was 3 lbs 12 oz, David James was 4 lbs 12 oz, and Katelyn Elizabeth was 4 lbs.  We were overjoyed to have them here and healthy! Our next concern would be getting me back into shape after spending so long in bed and getting them healthy and home.

Leave a comment